Educational Resources: History - Russia

 

Russian Revolution: Pre-Conditions Study Notes

An image of Tsar (Czar) Nicholas IIA collection of notes to aid in the study of the "Pre-Conditions" period before the Russian Revolution occurred in 1917. Please note, however, that they should not be used as a replacement for your own studies of the topic. Rather, they should be used to help consolidate your own notes, and/or as a quick revision tool before tests or exams. They are not intended to be complete or comprehensive, and instead are what I personally found to be significant in my own studies of the topic, either in preperation for tests/exams or the writing of essays. Read more...

Russian Revolution: Critical Period Study Notes

Soldiers in a line formation during the Russian Civil War.A collection of notes to aid in the study of the "Critical Period" of the Russian Revolution which effectively took hold in October 1917. Please note, however, that they should not be used as a replacement for your own studies of the topic. Rather, they should be used to help consolidate your own notes, and/or as a quick revision tool before tests or exams. They are not intended to be complete or comprehensive, and instead are what I personally found to be significant in my own studies of the topic, either in preperation for tests/exams or the writing of essays. In addition to this, they may contain notes outside of the period of study, in order to to fulfill the "Cause and Effect" requirement of many History curriculums. Read more...

Russian Revolution: Consolidation Period Study Notes

This poster reads "From the NEP Russia will come the socialist Russia." A collection of notes to aid in the study of the "Consolidation Period" of the Russian Revolution which effectively took hold in October 1917, yet spiralled out of control up until 1921. Please note, however, that they should not be used as a replacement for your own studies of the topic. Rather, they should be used to help consolidate your own notes, and/or as a quick revision tool before tests or exams. They are not intended to be complete or comprehensive, and instead are what I personally found to be significant in my own studies of the topic, either in preperation for tests/exams or the writing of essays. In addition to this, they may contain notes outside of the period of study, in order to to fulfill the "Cause and Effect" requirement of many History curriculums. Read more...

Russian Revolution: Post-Revolution Period Study Notes

Stalin smoking a pipe whilst writing.A collection of notes to aid in the study of the "Post-Revolution Period" of the Russian Revolution, during which the revolution, and the country, was transformed under the new leadership of Stalin. Please note, however, that they should not be used as a replacement for your own studies of the topic. Rather, they should be used to help consolidate your own notes, and/or as a quick revision tool before tests or exams. They are not intended to be complete or comprehensive, and instead are what I personally found to be significant in my own studies of the topic, either in preperation for tests/exams or the writing of essays. In addition to this, they may contain notes outside of the period of study, in order to to fulfill the "Cause and Effect" requirement of many History curriculums. Read more...

The ideals put into practice by Lenin and the Bolsheviks during the revolutionary period ultimately transpired once again during the
post-revolutionary period...

...under the direction of STALIN.

A poster depicting Stalin and Lenin working on the same plans.Every political party is driven by a set of comprehensible ideologies that are usually accepted by the majority of the party’s members, and before and during holding power, everything possible is done to gain popular appeal for them amongst the state’s people. However, what becomes apparent is that ideals preached before revolution do not eventuate in the same form, or possibly even at all, after revolution, and this is particularly true in regards to the Russian Revolution. The Marxist ideologies that gained a degree of acceptance before revolution would be vastly different to what the Marxist-driven Bolshevik party would implement when they finally obtained power. These significant Marxist ideologies that presented a Communist, utopian society to the Russian people included the following: a withering of the state apparatus, a classless society, communal control of the means of production and a dictatorship of the proletariat. The party also foretold a worldwide communist revolution. It would become apparent that none of these ideals would eventuate as originally told, and before revolution even occurred, the ideologies were in fact altered to include the ideas that there was no need for parliamentary democracy, and that the party must develop itself to become strong. To historians today, it is clear that Marxist ideologies were at the hands of a manipulative, inexperienced party who at many times appeared in over their heads. The ideals that truly transpired would become known as Marxist-Leninism, and it was these ideals put into practice by Lenin and the Bolsheviks during the revolutionary period that ultimately transpired once again during the post-revolutionary period under the direction of Stalin. This recurrent adverseness of ideologies ultimately had unfavourable effects on Russia politically, socially and economically, as the party’s two leaders between 1917 and 1953, Lenin and then Stalin, struggled to juggle between original ideals and what seemed contradictory but necessary action. Both Lenin and Stalin over time proved that they had a common goal: to spread communism to the world, and both followed the adverse set of Marxist ideals known as Marxist-Leninism that ultimately delivered anything but the promised Communist utopia to the Russian people. Read more...

Lenin’s rise to power transformed Russia into a state of misfortune, of which Stalin would build upon and intensify after Lenin’s death.

A black and white image of Lenin and Stalin seated together.Stalin’s regime may have proved to be one of the bloodiest in history, however what historians tend to neglect is that Stalin was simply continuing the dark and bloody path that Lenin indeed created before him. Following his rise to power, Lenin had transformed Russia into a state of misfortune, of which Stalin was able to build upon and intensify after Lenin’s death. This depressing state stemmed directly from the political, economic and social agendas of the Bolshevik party, or dare we say more so from the main Bolshevik leader himself.  By studying both primary and secondary sources, what becomes clear is a stark contrast between pre-revolutionary Russian society and the succession of bloody regimes that followed revolution in October 1917. To the people of the backwards pre-revolutionary society under the Tsar, their existence could be seen as a walk in the park when compared to the famines, terror, brutality and adversity that would plague Lenin’s revolutionary society, once hoped by some Russians to be a saving grace. And no one in October 1917 could have imagined the horrors that such revolutionary society was capable of producing after its leader, Lenin, died so suddenly in 1924, leaving the vicious reigns open for the once little-known Stalin to snatch up and retain for 20 long, painful years. Read more...

 


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